Truth by any Other Name

Originally posted on Sam Sorbo's Blog:

This morning, I woke up and checked the news for any report on the box office of my husband’s most recent film, God’s Not Dead, which opened last night. Imagine my surprise to find that, not only is it tracking to earn better than 50% more than initially expected, but the article in Variety failed to even mention one of the stars of the film. This is tremendously odd, because this same actor played the title role of at one time the most-watched television show in the world, and a pivotal supporting role in the smash hit Soul Surfer, and is a man who is recognized by people on the street, by name, world-wide. Of course, it’s

Kevin Sorbo

There, I wrote it – it’s not a swear word or a “banned” word (like Sheryl Sandberg’s “bossy”), it’s the name of the actor in the film that is “co-starring…

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I got so sick of politics I…

First, I want to thank the both of you who read this silly thing.  Your loyalty is humbling.

Second, I haven’t posted in a while.  As one of the gazillion and four people who wrote a largely political blog, I know my silence has been deafening.  Sorry about that.

I guess I should write something about what I have been doing the past few months, but why reinvent the wheel.  Read this instead:

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/were-not-in-camilla-anymore-country-lawyer-to-holl/ncKtL/

Weird, right?

So, in the coming weeks, I’m going to write about something far more interesting than politics. I’m going to tell you some stories about what its like to be a redneck in Hollywood.  I will tell you now that what you think you know about Hollywood is wrong.  Stay tuned.  (Both of you.)

More to come.

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CW’s ‘The 100′ Opens Well; CBS Veterans Top ‘American Idol’

Originally posted on Variety:

Fox’s “American Idol” continued its decline Wednesday, hitting a low and finishing behind the combo of “CSI” and “Survivor” on CBS in key demos. Those two nets were in a virtual draw as the top networks on a night that also saw a promising start for CW drama “The 100.”

According to preliminary national estimates from Nielsen, “The 100″ averaged a 0.9 rating/3 share in adults 18-49 and 2.7 million viewers overall in the 9 o’clock hour, building on its lead-in from “Arrow” (0.8/3 in 18-49, 2.4 million viewers overall).The post-apocalyptic drama based on a book of the same name fared especially well in New York, where its 1.5 rating/4 share in adults 18-49 edged out “American Idol” (1.4/4).

This was the largest audience in the Wednesday-at-9 hour for CW since September 2010, and it’s the net’s most popular midseason premiere since “Life Unexpected” in January 2010. Compared to the…

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Wild and crazy suggestion: Steve Martin proposes PC-friendly nickname for DC’s NFL team

Originally posted on Twitchy:

Ha! Well, President Obama and Bob Costas might be pleased by the effort.

Was Martin secretly unveiling the plot for a new movie? No, but it’s fun to think about:

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Congratulations @kwingfieldajc for selection as a finalist for @reason’s 2013 Bastiat Prize

Email from Reason Foundation:

October 10, 2013

Today Reason Foundation announced the finalists for the 2013 Bastiat Prize and Reason Video Prize, which will be presented at the Reason Media Awards ceremony on November 6.

The Bastiat Prize honors the writers who best explain the importance of freedom with originality, wit, and eloquence. The six Bastiat Prize finalists competing for $16,000 in prizes are:

  • Tamzin Booth, The Economist (U.K.)
  • Ross Clark, The Spectator (U.K.) and The Times (U.K.)
  • Lane Filler, Newsday
  • Dhiraj Nayyar, India Today
  • Stephanie Slade, U.S. News and World Report
  • Kyle Wingfield, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“These Bastiat Prize finalists represent the best of a very strong field of international journalists and it is an honor to recognize their work,” said Julian Morris, vice president of Reason Foundation. “The quality and volume of this year’s entries are proof that more and more journalists around the world are effectively challenging the statist assumptions of their peers and advancing freedom.”

The Bastiat Prize winner will receive $10,000, second-place will collect $5,000 and third-place will receive $1,000.

Previous Bastiat Prize winners include Virginia Postrel, Tim Harford, Mary Anastasia O’Grady, Robert Guest, Sauvik Chakraverti, Amity Shlaes and Anne Jolis.

The Bastiat Prize winner will be announced at Reason Foundation’s Media Awards on November 6, 2013 at the New York Yacht Club, where the first annual Reason Video Prize will also be presented.

More information: http://reason.org/news/show/reason-finalists-2013-bastiat-prize

The Reason Video Prize will honor short-form online video, film, and moving pictures that explore, investigate, or enrich libertarian beliefs in individual rights, limited government, and human possibilities. The finalists are:

  • Crony Chronicles: I want to be a cronyby Owen Brennan, Justin Folk, and Robert Perkins 
  • Game of Thrones Food Trucksby Isaac Reese for the Institute of Justice 
  • I, Pencilby Drew Tidwell for Passing Lane Films 
  • Obama That I Used To Knowby Justin Monticello for Just New Productions 
  • Top DHS Checkpoint Refusalsby Matt Mills 

“In just a few years, online video has become a widely available platform to speak back to power and explore every aspect of human freedom and ingenuity,” said Nick Gillespie, editor in chief of Reason.com. “These videos are great examples of what the future of video-and politics and journalism- will look like.”

Reason will also award the first-ever Lanny Friedlander Prize to Wired co-founders Louis Rossetto and Jane Metcalfe for their massive impact helping people understand the power of free minds and free markets through Wired’s analysis of technology, business, and culture.

- See more at: http://reason.org/news/show/reason-finalists-2013-bastiat-prize#sthash.RFdzHEOr.

The Bastiat Prize honors the writers who best explain the importance of freedom with originality, wit, and eloquence. The six Bastiat Prize finalists competing for $16,000 in prizes are:

  • Tamzin Booth, The Economist (U.K.) 
  • Ross Clark, The Spectator (U.K.) and The Times (U.K.) 
  • Lane Filler, Newsday
  • Dhiraj Nayyar, India Today
  • Stephanie Slade, U.S. News and World Report
  • Kyle Wingfield, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“These Bastiat Prize finalists represent the best of a very strong field of international journalists and it is an honor to recognize their work,” said Julian Morris, vice president of Reason Foundation. “The quality and volume of this year’s entries are proof that more and more journalists around the world are effectively challenging the statist assumptions of their peers and advancing freedom.”

The Bastiat Prize winner will receive $10,000, second-place will collect $5,000 and third-place will receive $1,000. Previous Bastiat Prize winners include Virginia Postrel, Tim Harford, Mary Anastasia O’Grady, Robert Guest, Sauvik Chakraverti, Amity Shlaes and Anne Jolis.

The Bastiat Prize winner will be announced at Reason Foundation’s Media Awards on November 6, 2013 at the New York Yacht Club

- See more at: http://reason.org/news/show/reason-finalists-2013-bastiat-prize#sthash.RFdzHEOr.dpuf

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Teaching Government as “God”

Originally posted on Sam Sorbo's Blog:

As part of the Common Core curriculum, fifth graders are taught the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Unsurprisingly, to those of us playing at home, it trumps the US Constitution and Bill of Rights. By these teaching standards, the United States is no longer sovereign, in any way , shape or form, just at the member nations of the UN would like things to be.

One young fifth grader brought home her aced exam, on which she had answered:

“Human rights are rights articulated by the government to uphold this country in shape. These rules are inalienable. They protect our country. The human rights are one of the most important rights ever. I think they hold this country together.”

To Britt’s surprise, the teacher gave full credit for that answer, which contradicts the Declaration of Independence, which states that individual rights derive from God, not government.

If rights…

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@DaveRamsey: “You are not exempt from math.”

Just watch. It’s self-explanatory.

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October 7, 2013 · 11:54 AM